Full Armor Reports

Status
Not open for further replies.
Thread starter #1

Viscount

Junior Member
Armor Reports
Use and Purpose​
The following reports are an armor crafter's observations on the armor types.
These reports may be of use for any armor crafter. They are also of use to the buyer, who may not otherwise have a chance to understand these armors.

Current state of the reports
Each report demands several hours of time. From ensuring that I have collected all the appropriate data (weights/mats/mits) to screenshots and direct comparisons, making these reports is something like a hobby.
But the time I have for this hobby Is dwindling.

Update 8/30/2015:
With school starting back up and other commitments, I find that I can no longer spend the time needed for additional armor reports.
However, I have a wealth of data, and should you have any specific questions I will be happy to give you an answer or an opinion. :)
 
Thread starter #2

Viscount

Junior Member
Sarducaan Guard

Strength and Mitigation
With respect to the other light armors, the armor is comparable to expilator in its defensive values. (stronger than tindremic scale, weaker than khurite splinted) See the spoiler below for a direct comparison.

The transparent black arrows represent the defensive values of Tindremic scale -- > Expilator -- > Khurite Splinted -- > Tindremic Guard in that order.
The dark black set of arrows represent the defensive values of sarducaan guard.

Through this we can see that the defensive values of sarducaan guard armor is roughly equivalent to that of expilator armor.
Like the other light armors, the Sarducaan guard armor serves two main purposes:
1.) Aesthetic appeal
2.) Mage set optimization

Visual Appeal
The Sarducaan guard armor looks like this when made of plate scale:
I find the helmet appealing, but the helmet's heaviness renders it unusable for serious mage armor sets. The houlder pads and gloves are especially attractive, and both the legs and the chest make for interesting combinations for the other armors.
Relative Weight & Mage set use

For a full comparison of the Sarducaan armor weights to similar armors, see below

Sarducaan guard armor has especially light weight shoulders, torso, gloves, and feet when compared to the tindremic scale and expilator armors. I would advise any crafter currently using tindremic scale shoulders, torso, gloves, or boots to replace them with their Sarducaan counterparts when possible. This replacement will both reduce wight while improving defensive qualities.

Additionally, Full density kallardian padded gloves and shoulders may be replaced by full density sarducaan guard gloves and shoulders. This adds a trivial amount of weight for a large increase in protection.

Heat Resistance

The following observations are those of Halafox with input from Hodo (see here).

It has been observed that sarducaan guard armor protects against heat when crafted using scales and backing materials made of silk, ironsilk, ironwool, wool. Guardfur was not reported.

It has also been observed that heavier density materials are less effective at protection from the heat. Sarducaan guard made of keeled scales is better at protecting from the heat than Sarducaan guard made of plate scales, for instance.

Overall, Sarducaan guard armor is an excellent addition to any serious crafter’s collection of mage armor sets.
 
Thread starter #3

Viscount

Junior Member
Draconigena Armatus
Draconigena armatus (armor of the dragonborn), commonly called “draco”, is one of the most beloved armors of the game.
Given draco’s large aesthetic appeal, extreme cost (see here), and general mystery surrounding the set, it is pertinent to present an overview of draco’s defensive, weight, and visual characteristics.

Acquisition

Involves killing the thorax, obtaining 4 (?) of its eyes, and trading them to an NPC vendor. Costs a couple thousand gold, when purchasing the book from players (More details on this process to be given at a later date.)

Strength and Damage Mitigation

Draco mitigates more piercing damage than any other known armor in the game. It protects both from player-made weapons (bows and spears) as well as the piercing damage of mobs (i.e. Sators). It is inferior to tindremic guard in both its slashing and blunt protection. More exact comparisons of draco to other heavy armors can be seen below.

Heavy armor comparison: Molarium/Ironsilk

The faint red lines represent the defensive characteristics of draco relative to the other heavy armors of which I have access.
Draco is vastly superior to all armors in piercing protection. When made of molarium, draco is somewhat inferior to tindremic guard in blunt protection, and moderately inferior to tindremic guard in slashing protection.
Armor comparison: Plate Scales/Ironsilk

Once again, draco is somewhat less protective against slashing and blunt than tindremic guard armor.
Heavy armor comparison: Ironbone/Guardfur
Like the other heavy armors, draco armor serves three primary purposes:
1.) Aesthetic appeal
2.) Mage set use
3.) Heavy set use

Visual Appeal

When made of plate scales, Draco looks like this:
Overall, draco is perhaps the distinctive armor of the game. I believe that it has been a part of Mortal since the game’s inception (see here).

Historically, draco shoulders have often been used in many heavy sets, even when it offered less protection than its tindremic plate or tindremic guard counterpart.
Rumors regarding the set existed, including the belief that the shoulders cause more equipment hits (see here). But I have found no evidence supporting this thought.

Mage Set Use and Relative Weight

When made of platescales/ironsilk, the weight of draco compares to the other armors in the following way:

Draco is especially lightweight in the torso, gloves, pants, and boots. In my own mage sets, I begin introducing draco at 8kg. The shoulders, while aesthetically pleasing, are too cumbersome for practical light weight sets. I believe that while valuable, draco is not a necessary addition to a crafter’s collection of mage sets because unlike the light armor (i.e. Sarducaan guard), it is too heavy to be an integral part of most mage sets.

Heavy Set Use

When optimizing hybrid and heavy weight armor, I use draco when I believe that the chest or legs need additional protection from piercing damage. When heavy weight set optimization and is needed, many parts of the draco set serve an integral role as a weight reducer. No matter the weight class, I often use a draco chest piece for both the protection from spears & arrows and for its aesthetic value.

Draco is especially useful in light weight, full steel sets. Because the chest, legs, gloves, and boots are relatively light, a full set of steel (using steel pieces from other sets) can be achieved as early as 23kg, without the use of lamellar. However, the metal costs of draco is equivalent to the metal costs of tindremic guard. Unlike direptor, draco does not conserve primary crafting materials.

Overall, draco has some utility for heavier weight mage sets (~8kg and above). It has excellent use in optimized mid weight sets and for metal sets. It surpasses all known armors in its defense against piercing weapons. While the lore book is costly, I believe that the acquisition of draco is a valuable (though far from necessary) long-term goal for any armor crafter.
 
Thread starter #4

Viscount

Junior Member
Direptor
In many ways, direptor armor is the counterpart to draco. While draco provides high piercing protection, direptor offers high slashing protection. Furthermore, some of its pieces are highly efficient in terms of weight to damage mitigation. It also has a distinctive look, although opinions about its aesthetic appeal differ.

Acquisition
[coming soon]

Strength and Damage Mitigation

Direptor mitigates more slashing damage than any other known armor in the game. It usually has good blunt protection. This makes it especially effective against many popular player-made weapons. A full set of direptor makes an effective, easy, and relatively inexpensive set of armor for pvp and pve use alike. More exact comparisons of direptor to other heavy armors can be seen below.

Heavy armor comparison: Molarium/Ironsilk

Direptor is superior to all armors in slashing protection. When made of molarium and ironsilk, direptor is equivalent to tindremic plate in piercing protection. Surprisingly, it is somewhat superior to all heavy armors in blunt protection when made of molarium and ironsilk.
Heavy armor comparison: Plate Scales/Ironsilk

To my knowledge, direptor always has increased slashing protection over the other armors. But the difference between it and the other armors changes with material combination. For example, direptor is especially effective in protection from slashing weapons when made of platescales/ironsilk. Its piercing protection, however, suffers.
Heavy armor comparison: Ironbone/Guardfur

In this analysis, we can see that direptor is only somewhat better than Kallardian lamellar in its protection against piercing and against blunt. As always, its slashing resistance is high. Although not visible in this image, blunt resistance is equal to that of draco, when made of ironbone and guardfur.
Like the other heavy armors, direptor armor serves three primary purposes:
1.) Aesthetic appeal
2.) Mage set use
3.) Heavy set use

Visual Appeal
Direptor looks like this

When dyed, the direptor chest piece can take many different looks. The helmet is the most widely used piece of direptor- not necessarily for its looks, but for its weight to defense rating (see below).

Mage Set Use and Relative Weight
When made of platescales/ironsilk, the weight of direptor compares to the other armors in the following way:
Direptor is especially lightweight in the sleeves and helmet. Most crafters, including myself, include a direptor helmet in all light weight mage sets (from 4kg to 8 or 9kg). The chest piece is too heavy for most mage sets.

Heavy Set Use

In any heavy weight set, direptor is useful for any part of the body which is believed to need extra slashing protection. I find that customers desire extra slashing protection for the arms and head. This is fortuitous, as these pieces are especially lightweight.

Like draco, direptor is especially useful in light weight, full steel sets. Because the helmet and sleeves are relatively light, a full set of steel (using steel pieces from other sets) can be achieved as early as 23kg, without the use of lamellar. A full set of direptor can be achieved at 24kg. This provides the greatest slashing protection of any steel armor set. Additionally, the primary material crafting costs of direptor are less than that of tindremic guard and draco.

Overall, the helmet of direptor has excellent use in all mage sets and in lightweight steel sets. It has good use in optimized mid weight sets. It surpasses all known armors in its defense against slashing weapons. I consider direptor to be a necessary skill for most armor crafters.
 
Thread starter #6

Viscount

Junior Member
<reserved>
Tind Plate
Quick summary: Inferior to tindremic guard, and has limited use. Excellent for beginning armor crafters not willing or able to spend ~300 on the tindremic guard book, or who simply need to equip their fighter without a lot of hassle.

The left shoulder is very light, and has some use in mid-weight hybrid armor.
 
Thread starter #7

Viscount

Junior Member
<reserved>
Expilator
Quick summary: With the addition of Sarducaan guard, expilator has limited use. Although aesthetically pleasing, none of it's armor pieces have a place in my armor sets because it is generally much heavier than it is strong when compared to the other light armor types.
 
Very nice work. Exposing some of my long held armor crafting secrets and strategies, notwithstanding the changes to the sliders. Look forward to seeing the completed analyses.
 
Amazing work. This is great information, not just for crafters, but for informed buyers. +1
 
Proof positive that gods walk among us bearing gifts. Many Thanks!
 

Tehmudjin

Well-Known Member
I wonder if SV really need to make entire sets of armor.

How about making a book for crafting a really cool helmet, then one book for the shoulders etc and spreading them all out in different dungeons and secret places and maybe one book in an event?

Then people would need to spend hours and hours to get the whole set, like dungeon raiding in WoW, but not just get it though repetative farming of a certain mob.

Edit: Ill post this in suggestions instead.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top