Translate the Lore Already!

Raknar

Senior Member
I support this thread.
 
Just give me the lore in Swedish I'll use google translate myself!
 
take this :3



The Sidoian mindset

In general, Sidoians almost seem to have a physical need of being a part of a clearly structured and hierarchical collective, no matter their individual position in that collective. Normally and historically, the tribe structure with its Worker/Philosopher arrangement is what constitutes this collective, however most Sidoian tribes and many individuals are now spread out in the world, with only sporadic contact.
Furthermore, it seems like the collective a Sidoian belongs to must have strict social and/or religious rules and dogmas, and preferably these dogmas should be rooted in mathematics, numerology (Isopsephy/Gematria), geometry, "logic" and the like (see examples below).

Without this, they become... mentally unstable. You could almost compare the Sidoians and their society to something like OCD (obsessive-compulsive disorder); in a Sidoian tribe with its plethora of regulations, the individual Sidoians show no symptoms of this compulsive behavior, it is as if the society with all its compulsive dogmas is making up for the “affliction” of its individuals. However if a Sidoian is not part of such a collective, he or she will personally start to show compulsive symptoms instead, in very irregular ways. The compulsive symptoms vary between individuals and are not “organized” like the tribe dogmas are - they may appear as anxiety, an urge to count and measure things over and over again, excessive hoarding, aversion to particular numbers or time periods, and all kind of nervous rituals.
However, although there are a multitude of rules imposed by Sidoian tribes doesn't necessarily mean that there are “punishments” of any sort for breaking them. A Sidoian simply doesn't break rules, because the idea of following rules - whatever the rules are - results in a mental reward, whereas breaking a rule leads to severe mental anxiety and uneasiness. In a Sidoian tribe, this of course gets even more emphasized as their culture also teaches them that breaking rules upsets the balance of things; “the rules and rituals are there for a higher purpose, we just have to learn more to understand what that purpose is”. This means that a Sidoian orphan raised in an outside community, if asked the question “Why don't you break the rules sometime, everybody else does?” probably would answer “I don't know, it simply feels wrong inside”, whereas a tribe-member probably would say “It upsets the balance of things”, because those are the words he has been taught, and they correspond well to his feelings. Now, this following of rules doesn't have anything to do with ethics or being “good”, as a Sidoian wouldn't hesitate to follow rules that for instance tells him to kill, and still answer “It feels wrong inside” if asked why he doesn't ignore those rules.
In a tribe, breaking rules is almost solely done by mistake, and if anyone does, it is his or her loss, and there is seldom any need for any punishment. In the case of an individual breaking the rules on numerous occasions, resulting in negative effects for the tribe, he or she would probably simply be cast out.
These two properties of the Sidoian mindset - the need for being a part of a collective, and the need for rules - affect them and their society in a number of ways in the post-Shinarian world.
Sidoians without a tribe
Solitary Sidoians are usually very lost in the world, and lone wanderers will often give a socially distrait, absent-minded, confused or somewhat deranged impression, although they might be extremely talented in their actual trade. Unless they join some form of group or society, and unless that community imposes strict rules, or lets them impose strict rules in return, there is always something lacking in their lives, and they start to show compulsive symptoms. Another problem is that many non-Sidoian communities have many conflicting or paradoxal rules, without Elders or Jurists to consult. A rootless Sidoian trying to follow conflicting rules, without guidance, is subjected to enormous mental pressure and is likely to eventually get confused, depressed or even schizophrenic. In an acute or life-and-death situation with conflicting rules, he may break down, panic, or mentally repress the entire situation - meaning simply mentally block off the people and/or objects involved as if they didn't exist.

Other Sidoians might find somewhat of a substitute in heavily regulated professions, perhaps as slaves or slave-drivers, or, unless they are met with suspicion and prejudice, in military organizations, advanced construction, law and jurisprudence, or as administrators of economy or staff. However, even the most complex organizations and rules of other cultures usually pale in comparison to those of a Sidoian tribe. Furthermore, most other human professions with strict or complex rules means a harsh environment (for instance in slavery or military), and/or have equally hard punishments for breaking the rules, even by mistake, and that is something a Sidoian might not be prepared for, or wish for. Needless to say, Sidoians are known for their loyalty and adherence (which of course really has nothing to do with “loyalty” as in allegiance or devotion, as it is simply an effect of their mindset), and some have attained high ranks in non-Sidoian societies.

Sidoian tribe-members visiting another society will always ask a lot about, and meticulously try to follow, its rules, but as they have the rules and laws of the tribe to rely on, and as they already “belong” to a tribe, they are much more mentally stable. However their constant asking about rules, combined with their non-questioning attitude towards strange rules (as long as they are not conflicting or mathematically illogical) makes them very easy to fool and this has earned them a reputation as dumb in many societies.
Sidoian tribes
The shattered and isolated tribes try to uphold the traditional rules and dogmas, but as one of the main principles of the Sidoian people is to gather and/or retrieve knowledge, the rules change over time as new or lost knowledge is acquired. This means that although all tribes you encounter have enormous lists of laws, regulations, rules and so on, they are sometimes very different. The tribes that do meet, back in Sidoia or outside, spend most of their time arguing over newly discovered knowledge and the validity of new dogmas, so even for those there is little or no consensus.

Your tribe
This means that you are rather free to come up with social/normal and “compulsive” rules for your Sidoian tribe as you see fit. I will give you a couple of examples of typical Sidoian compulsive dogmas you can find in Nave:

The rules of some tribes state that a person's free day of the week should be the same weekday he or she is born, meaning if you are born on a “Tuesday”, you will have your work-free day on “Tuesdays”. Furthermore, a Worker must do Philosophical work (and vice versa) every 9th year and the timing is decided in accordance to his or her name (when the digital root of the values of the letters in his name equals the digital root of the number of the current year*). This of course means that the whole tribe must work via a complex rotating schedule.

* For instance the merry butcher Sabas has a name with a value of:

S=19, A=1, B=2

SABAS = 19,1,2,1,19

19+1+2+1+19 = 42

4+2 = 6

This means that year 258 (2+5+8 = 15 (1+5) = 6) Sabas must do Philosophical work. His next year of Philosophical work is 267 (2+6+7 = 15 (1+5) =6).

Akeheka's Fourth Rule of Commerce states that whenever anyone pays someone for a service, the sum must be multiplied by a huge random number, and a small random number must then be added to that number (randomized numbers are most often generated with an abacus-like device). The participants must then find out if the resulting number is a prime number or not before the trade can take place and the (original) sum can be paid. The collected numbers and their prime status must be reported to a Counting Official on a weekly basis. Now, some scholars claim that this ancient rule was founded simply as a temporary means to gather a lot of prime/non-prime numbers so that Akeheka could reconstruct the forgotten Sieve of Uhu. As the Sieve of Uhu is long since constructed, the law has filled its purpose and is therefore obsolete and should be discarded. Other scholars refuse to believe this, for a number of reasons. This means that some tribes still apply the law in all trade while others do not.
Another example is the Sidoian naming. Many traditional Sidoian names are palindromes (can be read in either direction, such as Ana or Lemel, and also with spaces, such as in Ev Akave (evakave)). Beside the palindrome names, names with mathematical twists to them are common. Also, a person will often change his name when he changes occupation or rank. Short names indicate status, so generally newborns are given very long names, whereas people with a very high rank may have only one, two or three letters. Thus, a person might be born as Aheka Tôtakeha, and later shorten it by removing the outer 3 letters on each side to form Katôtak, and later to Tôt, and if he ever achieves a legendary status, Ô.
This generally means a shortage of names for legendary persons, as there can only be that many Ô's or A's or T's. However that does not necessarily pose a problem as the traditional Sidoian writing is based on pictograms (like Hieroglyphs), and as several pictograms can represent the same letter, an elevated person simply chooses or is assigned a symbol that represents that letter. A person may therefore be known both as Ô and as “Burning Sun”, as the symbol for Burning Sun means “Ô” if read as a letter.
Though to complicate matters further; when a person is mentioned, the point of time of the context is what decides what name should be used. Akeheka, who we stumbled upon above, founded many more laws at later dates, but you will find that for instance the Sixteenth Rule of Commerce is attributed to Kehek (Kehek's Sixteenth Rule of Commerce), not Akeheka, as he had changed his name at that point.

Background
Now, you might ask, why this inclination towards numerology, logic and mathematics, and why do they have these dogmas in the first place? Is it because of their former masters? Is it because they were slaves? Is it a religion, meaning is it for the gods?

The problem is that the tribes don't know why. That is lost knowledge. A Sidoian would probably compare it to a great equation; they have many parts of it, but many of the fundamental parts are lost. Hence they search for clues to those fundaments, and/or try to calculate them. That is also why it is so difficult to add new elements to the equation, because you can never check them for errors, you can only make estimations. And this is probably also why many of the later social rules have expanded into areas of society which the original rules never touched. A Sidoian scholar would say that at one point in time Sidoian "belief and practice" was purely concrete and logical, objectively speaking - but that at this point in time it is impossible to separate “science” from “religion” as more knowledge is required to know which of the new rules are right or wrong. But a new rule is a new rule, and if newly acquired knowledge means that the calculations says that a temple should be constructed, but that it can only be worked at every 142th day, and that it should be 1.618 meters in width and depth, and 33.3 meters high, and therefore practically unusable, that is what will be built.
All this said; don't be afraid of the mathematics and rules of the Sidoians when making your tribe. Rules may be very different from tribe to tribe, and nothing says you have to pick mathematical/logic rules that affect day-to-day gaming and RP'ing to the extreme. This is supposed to be fun and inspiring, and as long as you include any math or logic (and/or compulsive behavior) _at all_, and act like there are a lot of rules, it will be good Sidoian RP'ing. Also, you are of course free to come up with local “rules and formulas”; axioms, theorems, constants, conjectures and so on, and insert them into your lore as you see fit. For instance if you want a reason for why your houses are placed the way they are, you can always make up stuff like “The buildings are arranged to match the aperiodical tiling of the sacred Yur-mosaic”. And if you want to explain to someone why the members of your guild walk backwards 12 minutes every day as a means of travel, you can say that “What do you think? If we constantly walked forward, Hoh's Later Conjecture of Trichotomous Isomorphism clearly shows that the quasimetric topology of the land would make our Khorlos asymmetrical!”

[…]Thank you Mats and guys keep going, you are doing it right![…]
I hope I have managed to inspire you in one way or another. Feel free to ask me anything, but please remember that I have very little time to answer, if any

Best regards,
Mats
 
take this :3

The Sidoian mindset

In general, Sidoians almost seem to have a physical need of being a part of a clearly structured and hierarchical collective, no matter their individual position in that collective. Normally and historically, the tribe structure with its Worker/Philosopher arrangement is what constitutes this collective, however most Sidoian tribes and many individuals are now spread out in the world, with only sporadic contact.
Furthermore, it seems like the collective a Sidoian belongs to must have strict social and/or religious rules and dogmas, and preferably these dogmas should be rooted in mathematics, numerology (Isopsephy/Gematria), geometry, "logic" and the like (see examples below).

Without this, they become... mentally unstable. You could almost compare the Sidoians and their society to something like OCD (obsessive-compulsive disorder); in a Sidoian tribe with its plethora of regulations, the individual Sidoians show no symptoms of this compulsive behavior, it is as if the society with all its compulsive dogmas is making up for the “affliction” of its individuals. However if a Sidoian is not part of such a collective, he or she will personally start to show compulsive symptoms instead, in very irregular ways. The compulsive symptoms vary between individuals and are not “organized” like the tribe dogmas are - they may appear as anxiety, an urge to count and measure things over and over again, excessive hoarding, aversion to particular numbers or time periods, and all kind of nervous rituals.
However, although there are a multitude of rules imposed by Sidoian tribes doesn't necessarily mean that there are “punishments” of any sort for breaking them. A Sidoian simply doesn't break rules, because the idea of following rules - whatever the rules are - results in a mental reward, whereas breaking a rule leads to severe mental anxiety and uneasiness. In a Sidoian tribe, this of course gets even more emphasized as their culture also teaches them that breaking rules upsets the balance of things; “the rules and rituals are there for a higher purpose, we just have to learn more to understand what that purpose is”. This means that a Sidoian orphan raised in an outside community, if asked the question “Why don't you break the rules sometime, everybody else does?” probably would answer “I don't know, it simply feels wrong inside”, whereas a tribe-member probably would say “It upsets the balance of things”, because those are the words he has been taught, and they correspond well to his feelings. Now, this following of rules doesn't have anything to do with ethics or being “good”, as a Sidoian wouldn't hesitate to follow rules that for instance tells him to kill, and still answer “It feels wrong inside” if asked why he doesn't ignore those rules.
In a tribe, breaking rules is almost solely done by mistake, and if anyone does, it is his or her loss, and there is seldom any need for any punishment. In the case of an individual breaking the rules on numerous occasions, resulting in negative effects for the tribe, he or she would probably simply be cast out.
These two properties of the Sidoian mindset - the need for being a part of a collective, and the need for rules - affect them and their society in a number of ways in the post-Shinarian world.
Sidoians without a tribe
Solitary Sidoians are usually very lost in the world, and lone wanderers will often give a socially distrait, absent-minded, confused or somewhat deranged impression, although they might be extremely talented in their actual trade. Unless they join some form of group or society, and unless that community imposes strict rules, or lets them impose strict rules in return, there is always something lacking in their lives, and they start to show compulsive symptoms. Another problem is that many non-Sidoian communities have many conflicting or paradoxal rules, without Elders or Jurists to consult. A rootless Sidoian trying to follow conflicting rules, without guidance, is subjected to enormous mental pressure and is likely to eventually get confused, depressed or even schizophrenic. In an acute or life-and-death situation with conflicting rules, he may break down, panic, or mentally repress the entire situation - meaning simply mentally block off the people and/or objects involved as if they didn't exist.

Other Sidoians might find somewhat of a substitute in heavily regulated professions, perhaps as slaves or slave-drivers, or, unless they are met with suspicion and prejudice, in military organizations, advanced construction, law and jurisprudence, or as administrators of economy or staff. However, even the most complex organizations and rules of other cultures usually pale in comparison to those of a Sidoian tribe. Furthermore, most other human professions with strict or complex rules means a harsh environment (for instance in slavery or military), and/or have equally hard punishments for breaking the rules, even by mistake, and that is something a Sidoian might not be prepared for, or wish for. Needless to say, Sidoians are known for their loyalty and adherence (which of course really has nothing to do with “loyalty” as in allegiance or devotion, as it is simply an effect of their mindset), and some have attained high ranks in non-Sidoian societies.

Sidoian tribe-members visiting another society will always ask a lot about, and meticulously try to follow, its rules, but as they have the rules and laws of the tribe to rely on, and as they already “belong” to a tribe, they are much more mentally stable. However their constant asking about rules, combined with their non-questioning attitude towards strange rules (as long as they are not conflicting or mathematically illogical) makes them very easy to fool and this has earned them a reputation as dumb in many societies.
Sidoian tribes
The shattered and isolated tribes try to uphold the traditional rules and dogmas, but as one of the main principles of the Sidoian people is to gather and/or retrieve knowledge, the rules change over time as new or lost knowledge is acquired. This means that although all tribes you encounter have enormous lists of laws, regulations, rules and so on, they are sometimes very different. The tribes that do meet, back in Sidoia or outside, spend most of their time arguing over newly discovered knowledge and the validity of new dogmas, so even for those there is little or no consensus.

Your tribe
This means that you are rather free to come up with social/normal and “compulsive” rules for your Sidoian tribe as you see fit. I will give you a couple of examples of typical Sidoian compulsive dogmas you can find in Nave:

The rules of some tribes state that a person's free day of the week should be the same weekday he or she is born, meaning if you are born on a “Tuesday”, you will have your work-free day on “Tuesdays”. Furthermore, a Worker must do Philosophical work (and vice versa) every 9th year and the timing is decided in accordance to his or her name (when the digital root of the values of the letters in his name equals the digital root of the number of the current year*). This of course means that the whole tribe must work via a complex rotating schedule.

* For instance the merry butcher Sabas has a name with a value of:

S=19, A=1, B=2

SABAS = 19,1,2,1,19

19+1+2+1+19 = 42

4+2 = 6

This means that year 258 (2+5+8 = 15 (1+5) = 6) Sabas must do Philosophical work. His next year of Philosophical work is 267 (2+6+7 = 15 (1+5) =6).

Akeheka's Fourth Rule of Commerce states that whenever anyone pays someone for a service, the sum must be multiplied by a huge random number, and a small random number must then be added to that number (randomized numbers are most often generated with an abacus-like device). The participants must then find out if the resulting number is a prime number or not before the trade can take place and the (original) sum can be paid. The collected numbers and their prime status must be reported to a Counting Official on a weekly basis. Now, some scholars claim that this ancient rule was founded simply as a temporary means to gather a lot of prime/non-prime numbers so that Akeheka could reconstruct the forgotten Sieve of Uhu. As the Sieve of Uhu is long since constructed, the law has filled its purpose and is therefore obsolete and should be discarded. Other scholars refuse to believe this, for a number of reasons. This means that some tribes still apply the law in all trade while others do not.
Another example is the Sidoian naming. Many traditional Sidoian names are palindromes (can be read in either direction, such as Ana or Lemel, and also with spaces, such as in Ev Akave (evakave)). Beside the palindrome names, names with mathematical twists to them are common. Also, a person will often change his name when he changes occupation or rank. Short names indicate status, so generally newborns are given very long names, whereas people with a very high rank may have only one, two or three letters. Thus, a person might be born as Aheka Tôtakeha, and later shorten it by removing the outer 3 letters on each side to form Katôtak, and later to Tôt, and if he ever achieves a legendary status, Ô.
This generally means a shortage of names for legendary persons, as there can only be that many Ô's or A's or T's. However that does not necessarily pose a problem as the traditional Sidoian writing is based on pictograms (like Hieroglyphs), and as several pictograms can represent the same letter, an elevated person simply chooses or is assigned a symbol that represents that letter. A person may therefore be known both as Ô and as “Burning Sun”, as the symbol for Burning Sun means “Ô” if read as a letter.
Though to complicate matters further; when a person is mentioned, the point of time of the context is what decides what name should be used. Akeheka, who we stumbled upon above, founded many more laws at later dates, but you will find that for instance the Sixteenth Rule of Commerce is attributed to Kehek (Kehek's Sixteenth Rule of Commerce), not Akeheka, as he had changed his name at that point.

Background
Now, you might ask, why this inclination towards numerology, logic and mathematics, and why do they have these dogmas in the first place? Is it because of their former masters? Is it because they were slaves? Is it a religion, meaning is it for the gods?

The problem is that the tribes don't know why. That is lost knowledge. A Sidoian would probably compare it to a great equation; they have many parts of it, but many of the fundamental parts are lost. Hence they search for clues to those fundaments, and/or try to calculate them. That is also why it is so difficult to add new elements to the equation, because you can never check them for errors, you can only make estimations. And this is probably also why many of the later social rules have expanded into areas of society which the original rules never touched. A Sidoian scholar would say that at one point in time Sidoian "belief and practice" was purely concrete and logical, objectively speaking - but that at this point in time it is impossible to separate “science” from “religion” as more knowledge is required to know which of the new rules are right or wrong. But a new rule is a new rule, and if newly acquired knowledge means that the calculations says that a temple should be constructed, but that it can only be worked at every 142th day, and that it should be 1.618 meters in width and depth, and 33.3 meters high, and therefore practically unusable, that is what will be built.
All this said; don't be afraid of the mathematics and rules of the Sidoians when making your tribe. Rules may be very different from tribe to tribe, and nothing says you have to pick mathematical/logic rules that affect day-to-day gaming and RP'ing to the extreme. This is supposed to be fun and inspiring, and as long as you include any math or logic (and/or compulsive behavior) _at all_, and act like there are a lot of rules, it will be good Sidoian RP'ing. Also, you are of course free to come up with local “rules and formulas”; axioms, theorems, constants, conjectures and so on, and insert them into your lore as you see fit. For instance if you want a reason for why your houses are placed the way they are, you can always make up stuff like “The buildings are arranged to match the aperiodical tiling of the sacred Yur-mosaic”. And if you want to explain to someone why the members of your guild walk backwards 12 minutes every day as a means of travel, you can say that “What do you think? If we constantly walked forward, Hoh's Later Conjecture of Trichotomous Isomorphism clearly shows that the quasimetric topology of the land would make our Khorlos asymmetrical!”

[…]Thank you Mats and guys keep going, you are doing it right![…]
I hope I have managed to inspire you in one way or another. Feel free to ask me anything, but please remember that I have very little time to answer, if any
Best regards,
Mats
 
I couldn't read it before.

All I know about Sidoian men is that they are said to apply themselves to some very big numbers, and vice versa.
 
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